About your Search

20121001
20121031
STATION
CSPAN 3
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WRC 1
LANGUAGE
English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
cancer and you you wouldn't die from it. this money that we put in at ucla. they came up with a drug like that. went through phase 1 trial. went through phase 2 trial. it has gang busters doing great. all these -- it is working for all these women. so i'm not allowed to tell the name of the pharmaceutical company but they took our 1 million and turned it into a commitment of 10 190 million. >> mike: wonderful. i hope that our people will go to the website. it is on the screen and find out how to become part of the effort because there is so many people. every family has been touched. every family has been touched. >> they have been touched. >> mike: no exceptions. and if there is ways to help with the research to find cures and better ways to help people through the process, it would be a wonderful gift to millions of americans. thank you. >> thank you very much, governor. >> mike: always a joy to see you and your courage is amazing and inspiring. thank you, noreen. >> mike: before we go tonight, a personal word. last week matt turner the news anchor at little rock's kthb channel 11 which
wouldn't die from it. so, this mean that we put in at ucla, they came up with a drug like that. one through phase one trial and went through phase two trial and gang busters doing great and working for all of these women. not allowed to tell the name of the pharmaceutical company, but they took our one million and turned it into a commitment of 190 million. >> mike: wow. [applause] maureen, i hope that-- and go on the website and find the screen to become part of the effort. because there's so many people. every family has been touched. every. >> you're right, there has been. >> there's no exceptions. if there's ways to help with the research to find cures and better ways to help people through the process, it would be a can you feel gift to millions of americans. thank you. >> thank you, governor. >> mike: always, your courage is amazing. thank you. [applause] >> so, before we go tonight, a personal word. last week, matt turner, the news anchor at little rock's kthb, channel 11 which is the local cbs affiliate in little rock was killed in a car accident south of little rock. he wa
compete. in the guest spot is richard sanders professor at ucla and stewart taylor junior editor of harvard law review, co-authors of the new book out today "mismatch." welcome, gentlemen. >> thanks for having us. >> thank you. >> richard, let me start with you. you say affirmative action places mirnlt students with underperforming scores in schools they're not qualified for, thus making it hard to pass exit exams and so they leave not fully prepared. >> yeah, it's important to keep in mind that we're not saying that students aren't qualified to be in college. it's which college they go to. so the idea is that if you are admitted to a school where your credentials are lower, say 00 or 300 points lower than classmates. the teachers teach toward the middle of the class and you're likely to learn less. there's an outpouring of research showing in the sciences, blacks and business panics have high attrition rates because of mismatch. in law school they're twice as likely to fail bar exams and there's a loss of self-confidence among students that receive it. >> i know toure will quest
and i got dragged to this performance. it was a competition between ucla and usc. i thought it was going to be the most excruciating night of my life and by the end i was a huge dork. i was like, this is amazing, can we go meet them? it was a famous upset because ucla beat usc or vice versa. it went down in history. when i bring it up with people that know this world, they were like you were there, this famous night. >> that song, a capella, what's happening there. >> singing this complicated game. you have to wait. somebody else is singing the song and you have to wait for a lyric you know and take that lyric and start singing differently. there's all these rules to the game we play. >> for people who do not understand what a capella means. >> not linguine. >> not barber shop quartets, it's a somewhat new thing. >> like boyz ii men. >> pan okay, you would be the drums. >> solo. >> only one person singing the melody and words. you're creating an orchestra with just voices. >> the human voice. >> we're so excited. this movie, "pitch perfect" opens at a theater near you. >> you are the cut
in their community by investing in my education. i promise to come back as a doctor. with their help, i went to ucla and then to harvard medical school, where i became the first latino to receive three graduate degrees from harvard. true to my promise, i came home as an e.r. doctor. i am living proof of the american dream. for too many people, the american dream is in danger because washington is broken. too many workers have lost their jobs. too many retirees have lost their savings. too many students cannot afford college. our congresswoman has lost touch with the people. instead of looking out for us, they're focused on partisan bickering, scoring political points, and looking out for themselves and their wealthy donors. congresswoman's response to our problems is more of the same. more bickering, or partisanship, and more looking out for herself instead of us. instead of listening to people and proposing real solutions, she relies on the same old worn out partisan playbook that does nothing to create jobs or help seniors on fixed incomes. watch tonight how many time she talks and says empty phra
years of the reagan administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in oct
. and later vice president george bush and michael dukakis in 1988 from ucla. that's at 9:50 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> to focus on the presidential debates this month, c-span is asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of c-span's student cam video documentary competition. students will answer what's the most important issue that the president should answer for a chance to win $5,000 and there's $50,000 in total prizes. it's open for students age 6 through 12. go online to studentcam.org. >> next, republican ted cruz will debate paul saddler for the open texas senate seat vacated by kay bailey hutchyson. it's curtsy of kera tv. ted cruz is the former solictor of texas. it's just over an hour. >> this is the texas debate. we're broadcasting live from the kera studios in dallas and online at texasdebate.org. during the next hour i'll be the moderator for the final debate between republican ted cruz, the former solicitor of texas and paul saddler. welcome to our panelists -- ross ramsey, and pedro rojas, anchor for univision in houston. we invite you
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)